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New slideshow: Featured NASA images set to an excerpt from "Earth" by One Ring Zero


The New York City indie band One Ring Zero is a friend of gogblog. Band cofounder Michael Hearst kindly gave us blanket permission to use the band’s music in slideshows and videos. Here is the latest: a sampling of “featured images” from the NASA/Goddard Sciences and Exploration Directorate website: sciences.gsfc.nasa.gov. It’s set to an excerpt from ORZ’s composition Earth, which is in the band’s “Planets” CD.

In a previous video featuring ORZ’s music, we celebrated the Hubble Space Telescope’s one millionth scientific observation. I like to think that the success of that piece in the blogosphere owed as much to ORZ’s music as the stunning Hubble pix.

 

Christian Ready's video explainer about exoplanet Kepler 22b

December 22, 2011 3 comments

My friend Christian Ready, a web developer who used to work on the Hubble Space Telescope mission, has made a clear, well-paced, and visually captivating explainer video about “the discovery of Kepler 22b, a planet orbiting a star not unlike our own sun at a distance where life can thrive.” (This is the finding that was announced BEFORE the more recent announcement of Kepler 20e and 20f, Earth-sized planets that are not in the so-called “habitable zone” of their star.) You can see other videos by Christian on his YouTube channel.



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OH AND DID I MENTION? All opinions and opinionlike objects in this blog are mine alone and NOT those of NASA or Goddard Space Flight Center. And while we’re at it, links to websites posted on this blog do not imply endorsement of those websites by NASA.

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The Carbon Crisis in 90 Seconds: Goddard Earth scientist Peter Griffith explains the difference between a banana and a lump of coal

December 20, 2011 Leave a comment

still image of banana and lump of coal from peter griffith video
In the run up to last week’s “Best of Goddard” film festival, I came to know Peter Griffith. It turned out we both had made science-related videos in 2011, but missed the deadline to submit them to the Best of Goddard screening. (Mine was a Hubble music video.) Better luck next year! You can see “Best of” videos here, here, here, and here.

Griffith’s day job is managing the NASA Carbon Cycle and Ecosystems research office. But he’s also been active in an interagency program called Earth to Sky, helping to teach national park public education “interpreters” about carbon and climate change so they can incorporate that knowledge into their talks and tours.

Thus was born the video below, which explains the difference between a banana and a lump of coal with respect to Earth’s climate. I won’t get into the details here; the film speaks for itself. It’s a clever and highly effective way to explain a scientific concept that could have easily become deadly dull in the wrong hands.





Griffith made The Carbon Crisis in 90 seconds in collaboration with Eric Mortensen, a graduate student at the Maryland Institute College of Art who was a 2011 summer intern at Goddard. It was one of the 10 videos selected for the American Geophysical Union “S Factor” Science Video Workshop, held in San Francisco on December 6th, 2011. See some of the videos here.

Three Hollywood filmmakers critiqued Griffith’s video and, he says, they liked it. It was one of three that got the nod from one of the filmmaker’s pre-teenage daughter. “I was kind of expecting a little bit harsher treatment,” Griffith says.

The animated version of the film is a more artistically evolved version of what Griffith calls his “talking head version,” with him on camera, well, talking a lot. That segment was originally produced for use on National Park Service Web Rangers site for kids aged 8-12 to earn merit badges by learning some Earth science.

Griffith has plans to obtain a summer intern in 2012 to make another film about carbon and climate (concept as-yet-undetermined). Geeked On Goddard has only one bit of advice: Stick with the banana.


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OH AND DID I MENTION? All opinions and opinionlike objects in this blog are mine alone and NOT those of NASA or Goddard Space Flight Center. And while we’re at it, links to websites posted on this blog do not imply endorsement of those websites by NASA.


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Best of Goddard Video 2011: Promoting NASA's Work

December 15, 2011 1 comment

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On Friday this week, NASA/Goddard filmmakers, writers, and animators will screen what they consider their best work of 2011. It’s called the Best of Goddard Film Festival, and it’s held every year about this time for Goddard employees. (For employees, the festival will run from 10:30 am to 12:30 pm in the Goett Auditorium, Building 3.)

Even if you are “outside the Center” and can’t be here with us, you can still watch and enjoy the entries to the festival that are available on YouTube on the NASA Explorer channel. They’ll run in groups this week on the blog.

Previous posts featured NASA scientific discoveries from 2011, Space Technology, and our beautiful universe.

Today, let’s look at videos created to promote the work that NASA does. It’s a variety of things, including contests and a video for kids about the NPP satellite.

OPTIMUS PRIME and NASA Team Up To Raise Awareness of NASA Technology

  • Animators: Walt Feimer (HTSI) (Lead), Chris Smith (HTSI)
  • Video Editor: Chris Smith (HTSI)
  • Narrators: Peter Cullen Chris Smith (HTSI)
  • Producers: Chris Smith (HTSI) Walt Feimer (HTSI)
  • Videographer: Chris Smith (HTSI)




Earth Day 2011 “Home Frontier” Video Contest Trailer

  1. Video Editor: Matthew R. Radcliff (UMBC)
  2. Producer: Matthew R. Radcliff (UMBC)
  3. Writer: Patrick Lynch (Wyle Information Systems)



NPPy: Big Planet, Little Bear

  • Animators: Walt Feimer (HTSI) (Lead), Michael Lentz (UMBC), Ryan Zuber (UMBC)
  • Video Editor: Rich Melnick (HTSI)
  • Narrators: Katie Lewis (USRA), Marci Delaney (UMBC/GSFC)
  • Producers: Walt Feimer (HTSI), Rich Melnick (HTSI), Silvia Stoyanova (USRA)
  • Writers: Ryan Fitzgibbons (USRA), Chris Smith (HTSI)



NPP: Why another Earth observing satellite?
Producer: Silvia Stoyanova


See Goddard in 3D!

  • Producers: Victoria Weeks (HTSI), Michael Starobin (HTSI)
  • Scientist: David Adamec (NASA/GSFC)
  • Videographers: Victoria Weeks (HTSI), Michael Starobin (HTSI)
  • Writers: Michael Starobin (HTSI), Victoria Weeks (HTSI)




OH AND DID I MENTION? All opinions and opinionlike objects in this blog are mine alone and NOT those of NASA or Goddard Space Flight Center. And while we’re at it, links to websites posted on this blog do not imply endorsement of those websites by NASA.


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Best of Goddard Video 2011: Beautiful Universe

December 14, 2011 3 comments

multiple wavelenth sun imageOn Friday this week, NASA/Goddard filmmakers, writers, and animators will screen what they consider their best work of 2011. It’s called the Best of Goddard Film Festival, and it’s held every year about this time for Goddard employees. (For employees, the festival will run from 10:30 am to 12:30 pm in the Goett Auditorium, Building 3.)

Even if you are “outside the Center” and can’t be here with us, you can still watch and enjoy the entries to the festival that are available on YouTube on the NASA Explorer channel. They’ll run in groups this week on the blog.

Previous posts featured NASA scientific discoveries from 2011 and Space Technology. Today, let’s look at videos featuring scientific phenomenon in our beautiful universe.

SDO: Year One

  • Video Editor:Scott Wiessinger (UMBC)
  • Producer:Scott Wiessinger (UMBC)
  • Scientist:Barbara Thompson (NASA/GSFC)
  • Writer:Barbara Thompson (NASA/GSFC)



Massive Solar Eruption Close-up
Animator:Tom Bridgman (GST)
Video Editor:Scott Wiessinger (USRA)
Producer:Scott Wiessinger (USRA)



Lunar Eclipse Essentials

  • Animators:Chris Smith (HTSI) Ernie Wright (USRA)
  • Video Editor:Chris Smith (HTSI)
  • Narrator:Chris Smith (HTSI)
  • Producer:Chris Smith (HTSI)
  • Scientist:Richard Vondrak (NASA/GSFC)
  • Writer:Chris Smith (HTSI)

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OH AND DID I MENTION? All opinions and opinionlike objects in this blog are mine alone and NOT those of NASA or Goddard Space Flight Center. And while we’re at it, links to websites posted on this blog do not imply endorsement of those websites by NASA.

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Best Goddard Videos of 2011: Space Technology

December 13, 2011 Leave a comment

On Friday this week, NASA/Goddard filmmakers, writers, and animators will screen what they consider their best work of 2011. It’s called the Best of Goddard Film Festival, and it’s held every year about this time for Goddard employees. (For employees, the festival will run from 10:30 am to 12:30 pm in the Goett Auditorium, Building 3.)

Even if you are “outside the Center,” you can still watch and enjoy the entries to the festival that are available on YouTube on the NASA Explorer channel. They’ll run in groups this week on the blog.

Yesterday’s post featured NASA scientific discoveries from 2011. Today, let’s look at videos about space and satellite technology.


Intro to LIDAR

  • Animators: Walt Feimer (HTSI) (Lead) Chris Smith (HTSI)
  • Video Editor: Chris Smith (HTSI)
  • Producer: Chris Smith (HTSI)
  • Scientist: Gregory Neumann (Massachusetts Institute of Technology)
  • Videographer: Rob Andreoli (AIMM)
  • Writer: Chris Smith (HTSI)




LEND: The Lunar Neutron Counter

  • Animator: Chris Smith (HTSI)
  • Video Editor: Chris Smith (HTSI)
  • Narrator: Chris Smith (HTSI)
  • Producer: Chris Smith (HTSI)
  • Scientists: Richard Vondrak (NASA/GSFC); John Keller (NASA/GSFC)
  • Writer: Chris Smith (HTSI)




So, You Want To Build a Satellite?

  • Animator: Chris Smith (HTSI) (Lead)
  • Video Editor: Chris Smith (HTSI)
  • Narrator: Chris Smith (HTSI)
  • Producer: Chris Smith (HTSI)
  • Scientist: Bruce Jakosky (LASP)
  • Writer:Chris Smith (HTSI)

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OH AND DID I MENTION? All opinions and opinionlike objects in this blog are mine alone and NOT those of NASA or Goddard Space Flight Center. And while we’re at it, links to websites posted on this blog do not imply endorsement of those websites by NASA.


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Best Goddard Videos of 2011: Scientific Discoveries

December 12, 2011 2 comments

On Friday this week, NASA/Goddard filmmakers, writers, and animators will screen what they consider their best work of 2011. It’s called the Best of Goddard Film Festival, and it’s held every year about this time for Goddard employees. (For employees, the festival will run from 10:30 am to 12:30 pm in the Goett Auditorium, Building 3.)

Even if you are “outside the Center,” you can still watch and enjoy the entries to the festival. They’ll run in groups this week on the blog.

The first group featured on the blog today focuses on NASA scientific discoveries from 2011. Which of these do you like best and why? Reply to the Geeked on Goddard comments section.

Terrestrial Gamma-ray Flashes

  • Animators: Walt Feimer (HTSI) (Lead); Scott Wiessinger (UMBC); Joseph Dwyer (FIT); Chris Meaney (HTSI)
  • Video Editor: Scott Wiessinger (UMBC)
  • Narrator: Karen Fox (ASI)
  • Producer: Scott Wiessinger (UMBC)
  • Writers: Francis Reddy (SPSYS); Scott Wiessinger (UMBC)



Swift and Hubble Probe an Asteroid Crash

  • Animators: Michael Lentz (UMBC) (Lead); Walt Feimer (HTSI); Scott Wiessinger (UMBC); Chris Smith (HTSI); Jake Dean (Aloe Design Studios); Chris Meaney (HTSI)
  • Video Editor: Scott Wiessinger (UMBC)
  • Narrator: Scott Wiessinger (UMBC)
  • Producer: Scott Wiessinger (UMBC)
  • Scientist: Dennis Bodewits (University of Maryland College Park)
  • Writers: Francis Reddy (SPSYS); Scott Wiessinger (UMBC)




DNA Building Blocks Can Be Made in Space

  • Animators: Chris Smith (HTSI) (Lead); Tyler Chase (UMBC)
  • Video Editor: Chris Smith (HTSI)
  • Interviewee: Michael P. Callahan (NASA/GSFC)
  • Producer: Chris Smith (HTSI)
  • Scientist: Michael P. Callahan (NASA/GSFC)
  • Videographer: Ryan Fitzgibbons (USRA)

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OH AND DID I MENTION? All opinions and opinionlike objects in this blog are mine alone and NOT those of NASA or Goddard Space Flight Center. And while we’re at it, links to websites posted on this blog do not imply endorsement of those websites by NASA.

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Model rocket attacks real (big) rocket!

July 27, 2011 2 comments
Looking up: Model rocket enthusiasts at the NASA Goddard visitor center

Looking up: Model rocket enthusiasts at the NASA Goddard visitor center


On Sunday, July 17, model rocket enthusiasts gathered at the Goddard Space Flight Center Visitor Center to commemorate the historic Apollo 11 launch and landing in 1969. Below is a clip of a puny model rocket “attacking” the magnificent, towering Thor Delta in back of the VC. Lucky strike! Watch it in HD/full screen for the full and dramatic effect of this modern-day reenactment of David vs. Goliath.

Regular public rocket launches began in 1976 as a program of the new Visitor Center and, of course, to mark the nation’s bicentennial. These days, it’s not uncommon for multiple generations to participate — even children of children of people who attended the early launches!

The special Apollo 11 launch event began in 1980. It’s always been on the third Sunday of July, which makes sure it coincides reasonably with the Apollo 11 anniversary.

“We have flown altitude, parachute duration, streamer duration and spot landing events over the years. I think we have kind of settled down for spot landing now,” explains Ed Pearson, a local model rocket enthusiast and longtime associate of the Visitor Center who helped start the public launches at Goddard.

More on that in a future post. Turns out the Visitor Center building has a more interesting history than imagined. More details to come…



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OH AND DID I MENTION? All opinions and opinionlike objects in this blog are mine alone and NOT those of NASA or Goddard Space Flight Center. And while we’re at it, links to websites posted on this blog do not imply endorsement of those websites by NASA.

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Check out the Viz — a new way to explore the planet and beyond

photo of ipad with nasa viz app displayed

In the past year or so, I was involved in a project here at Goddard to create a new iPad app and it’s finally out. It’s called the NASA Visualization Explorer.

I know, I know — what do they mean by “visualization”? Pardon the jargon. It’s the local industry around here.

“Visualization” is sorta what it sounds like. It’s the process of making something visual. In this case, the thing being visualized is data from NASA’s fleet of scientific satellites.

The crack team of scientist-artists at NASA Goddard’s Scientific Visualization Studio crank this stuff out, and some of it is truly amazing work. But it doesn’t necessarily reach the public. The new iPad app will help to spread the good news: “We got viz!”

If you have an iPad, check this thing out and let us know what you think.


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OH AND DID I MENTION? All opinions and opinionlike objects in this blog are mine alone and NOT those of NASA or Goddard Space Flight Center. And while we’re at it, links to websites posted on this blog do not imply endorsement of those websites by NASA.

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Hubble Space Telescope: one in a million

July 6, 2011 1 comment

The Hubble Space Telescope has captured its one-millionth scientific observation. To commemorate, here is more than 200 of the most spectacular Hubble images, set to music from the Planets album by the New York City band One Ring Zero. Many thanks to One Ring Zero co-leader Michael Hearst for extending permission to use the song Pluto in this video. And thanks to NASA fan Alex Grzybowski of Glenelg Country School for right-clicking more than 200 Hubble images off Hubblesite for this project.


Download the video (.m4v, 28 Mb)

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OH AND DID I MENTION? All opinions and opinionlike objects in this blog are mine alone and NOT those of NASA or Goddard Space Flight Center. And while we’re at it, links to websites posted on this blog do not imply endorsement of those websites by NASA.

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