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New Comet Lovejoy video from SDO/SOHO Picture of the Week

December 21, 2011 Leave a comment



Steele Hill, NASA Goddard’s herald of all things heliospheric, just posted his latest  release of imagery, courtesy of NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) and the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO). Steele creates these images and videos for display in science museums and other public places. The video and image in this post combined solar imagery from both SDO and SOHO of the rounding of the sun by Comet Lovejoy last week. Steele’s  descriptive text (below) explains the details.

And by the way, Steele and his colleagues have just surpassed their 500th solar “Picture of the Week.” It took 10 years. Congratulations!

“Comet Lovejoy came into view on Dec. 14 as a bright, white streak, skimmed across the Sun’s edge about 140,000 km above the surface late Dec. 15 and early Dec. 16, 2011, furiously brightening and vaporizing as it approached the Sun. It exited our field of view on Dec. 18. It was the brightest sun-grazing comet that SOHO had ever seen, with a nucleus about twice as wide as a football field. It unexpectedly survived the pass and cruised out from behind the Sun some hours later. Comets are ancient balls of dust and ice.

“In this still and movie, we combine views from SOHO’s two different coronagraphs (which block out the Sun) with solar Dynamics Observatory’s view of the Sun itself.  Note how the tail of the comet always turns away from the Sun due to the forces of the solar wind.”






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OH AND DID I MENTION? All opinions and opinionlike objects in this blog are mine alone and NOT those of NASA or Goddard Space Flight Center. And while we’re at it, links to websites posted on this blog do not imply endorsement of those websites by NASA.

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The Carbon Crisis in 90 Seconds: Goddard Earth scientist Peter Griffith explains the difference between a banana and a lump of coal

December 20, 2011 Leave a comment

still image of banana and lump of coal from peter griffith video
In the run up to last week’s “Best of Goddard” film festival, I came to know Peter Griffith. It turned out we both had made science-related videos in 2011, but missed the deadline to submit them to the Best of Goddard screening. (Mine was a Hubble music video.) Better luck next year! You can see “Best of” videos here, here, here, and here.

Griffith’s day job is managing the NASA Carbon Cycle and Ecosystems research office. But he’s also been active in an interagency program called Earth to Sky, helping to teach national park public education “interpreters” about carbon and climate change so they can incorporate that knowledge into their talks and tours.

Thus was born the video below, which explains the difference between a banana and a lump of coal with respect to Earth’s climate. I won’t get into the details here; the film speaks for itself. It’s a clever and highly effective way to explain a scientific concept that could have easily become deadly dull in the wrong hands.





Griffith made The Carbon Crisis in 90 seconds in collaboration with Eric Mortensen, a graduate student at the Maryland Institute College of Art who was a 2011 summer intern at Goddard. It was one of the 10 videos selected for the American Geophysical Union “S Factor” Science Video Workshop, held in San Francisco on December 6th, 2011. See some of the videos here.

Three Hollywood filmmakers critiqued Griffith’s video and, he says, they liked it. It was one of three that got the nod from one of the filmmaker’s pre-teenage daughter. “I was kind of expecting a little bit harsher treatment,” Griffith says.

The animated version of the film is a more artistically evolved version of what Griffith calls his “talking head version,” with him on camera, well, talking a lot. That segment was originally produced for use on National Park Service Web Rangers site for kids aged 8-12 to earn merit badges by learning some Earth science.

Griffith has plans to obtain a summer intern in 2012 to make another film about carbon and climate (concept as-yet-undetermined). Geeked On Goddard has only one bit of advice: Stick with the banana.


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OH AND DID I MENTION? All opinions and opinionlike objects in this blog are mine alone and NOT those of NASA or Goddard Space Flight Center. And while we’re at it, links to websites posted on this blog do not imply endorsement of those websites by NASA.


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Best of Goddard Video 2011: Promoting NASA's Work

December 15, 2011 1 comment

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On Friday this week, NASA/Goddard filmmakers, writers, and animators will screen what they consider their best work of 2011. It’s called the Best of Goddard Film Festival, and it’s held every year about this time for Goddard employees. (For employees, the festival will run from 10:30 am to 12:30 pm in the Goett Auditorium, Building 3.)

Even if you are “outside the Center” and can’t be here with us, you can still watch and enjoy the entries to the festival that are available on YouTube on the NASA Explorer channel. They’ll run in groups this week on the blog.

Previous posts featured NASA scientific discoveries from 2011, Space Technology, and our beautiful universe.

Today, let’s look at videos created to promote the work that NASA does. It’s a variety of things, including contests and a video for kids about the NPP satellite.

OPTIMUS PRIME and NASA Team Up To Raise Awareness of NASA Technology

  • Animators: Walt Feimer (HTSI) (Lead), Chris Smith (HTSI)
  • Video Editor: Chris Smith (HTSI)
  • Narrators: Peter Cullen Chris Smith (HTSI)
  • Producers: Chris Smith (HTSI) Walt Feimer (HTSI)
  • Videographer: Chris Smith (HTSI)




Earth Day 2011 “Home Frontier” Video Contest Trailer

  1. Video Editor: Matthew R. Radcliff (UMBC)
  2. Producer: Matthew R. Radcliff (UMBC)
  3. Writer: Patrick Lynch (Wyle Information Systems)



NPPy: Big Planet, Little Bear

  • Animators: Walt Feimer (HTSI) (Lead), Michael Lentz (UMBC), Ryan Zuber (UMBC)
  • Video Editor: Rich Melnick (HTSI)
  • Narrators: Katie Lewis (USRA), Marci Delaney (UMBC/GSFC)
  • Producers: Walt Feimer (HTSI), Rich Melnick (HTSI), Silvia Stoyanova (USRA)
  • Writers: Ryan Fitzgibbons (USRA), Chris Smith (HTSI)



NPP: Why another Earth observing satellite?
Producer: Silvia Stoyanova


See Goddard in 3D!

  • Producers: Victoria Weeks (HTSI), Michael Starobin (HTSI)
  • Scientist: David Adamec (NASA/GSFC)
  • Videographers: Victoria Weeks (HTSI), Michael Starobin (HTSI)
  • Writers: Michael Starobin (HTSI), Victoria Weeks (HTSI)




OH AND DID I MENTION? All opinions and opinionlike objects in this blog are mine alone and NOT those of NASA or Goddard Space Flight Center. And while we’re at it, links to websites posted on this blog do not imply endorsement of those websites by NASA.


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Best of Goddard Video 2011: Beautiful Universe

December 14, 2011 3 comments

multiple wavelenth sun imageOn Friday this week, NASA/Goddard filmmakers, writers, and animators will screen what they consider their best work of 2011. It’s called the Best of Goddard Film Festival, and it’s held every year about this time for Goddard employees. (For employees, the festival will run from 10:30 am to 12:30 pm in the Goett Auditorium, Building 3.)

Even if you are “outside the Center” and can’t be here with us, you can still watch and enjoy the entries to the festival that are available on YouTube on the NASA Explorer channel. They’ll run in groups this week on the blog.

Previous posts featured NASA scientific discoveries from 2011 and Space Technology. Today, let’s look at videos featuring scientific phenomenon in our beautiful universe.

SDO: Year One

  • Video Editor:Scott Wiessinger (UMBC)
  • Producer:Scott Wiessinger (UMBC)
  • Scientist:Barbara Thompson (NASA/GSFC)
  • Writer:Barbara Thompson (NASA/GSFC)



Massive Solar Eruption Close-up
Animator:Tom Bridgman (GST)
Video Editor:Scott Wiessinger (USRA)
Producer:Scott Wiessinger (USRA)



Lunar Eclipse Essentials

  • Animators:Chris Smith (HTSI) Ernie Wright (USRA)
  • Video Editor:Chris Smith (HTSI)
  • Narrator:Chris Smith (HTSI)
  • Producer:Chris Smith (HTSI)
  • Scientist:Richard Vondrak (NASA/GSFC)
  • Writer:Chris Smith (HTSI)

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OH AND DID I MENTION? All opinions and opinionlike objects in this blog are mine alone and NOT those of NASA or Goddard Space Flight Center. And while we’re at it, links to websites posted on this blog do not imply endorsement of those websites by NASA.

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Best Goddard Videos of 2011: Space Technology

December 13, 2011 Leave a comment

On Friday this week, NASA/Goddard filmmakers, writers, and animators will screen what they consider their best work of 2011. It’s called the Best of Goddard Film Festival, and it’s held every year about this time for Goddard employees. (For employees, the festival will run from 10:30 am to 12:30 pm in the Goett Auditorium, Building 3.)

Even if you are “outside the Center,” you can still watch and enjoy the entries to the festival that are available on YouTube on the NASA Explorer channel. They’ll run in groups this week on the blog.

Yesterday’s post featured NASA scientific discoveries from 2011. Today, let’s look at videos about space and satellite technology.


Intro to LIDAR

  • Animators: Walt Feimer (HTSI) (Lead) Chris Smith (HTSI)
  • Video Editor: Chris Smith (HTSI)
  • Producer: Chris Smith (HTSI)
  • Scientist: Gregory Neumann (Massachusetts Institute of Technology)
  • Videographer: Rob Andreoli (AIMM)
  • Writer: Chris Smith (HTSI)




LEND: The Lunar Neutron Counter

  • Animator: Chris Smith (HTSI)
  • Video Editor: Chris Smith (HTSI)
  • Narrator: Chris Smith (HTSI)
  • Producer: Chris Smith (HTSI)
  • Scientists: Richard Vondrak (NASA/GSFC); John Keller (NASA/GSFC)
  • Writer: Chris Smith (HTSI)




So, You Want To Build a Satellite?

  • Animator: Chris Smith (HTSI) (Lead)
  • Video Editor: Chris Smith (HTSI)
  • Narrator: Chris Smith (HTSI)
  • Producer: Chris Smith (HTSI)
  • Scientist: Bruce Jakosky (LASP)
  • Writer:Chris Smith (HTSI)

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OH AND DID I MENTION? All opinions and opinionlike objects in this blog are mine alone and NOT those of NASA or Goddard Space Flight Center. And while we’re at it, links to websites posted on this blog do not imply endorsement of those websites by NASA.


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Best Goddard Videos of 2011: Scientific Discoveries

December 12, 2011 2 comments

On Friday this week, NASA/Goddard filmmakers, writers, and animators will screen what they consider their best work of 2011. It’s called the Best of Goddard Film Festival, and it’s held every year about this time for Goddard employees. (For employees, the festival will run from 10:30 am to 12:30 pm in the Goett Auditorium, Building 3.)

Even if you are “outside the Center,” you can still watch and enjoy the entries to the festival. They’ll run in groups this week on the blog.

The first group featured on the blog today focuses on NASA scientific discoveries from 2011. Which of these do you like best and why? Reply to the Geeked on Goddard comments section.

Terrestrial Gamma-ray Flashes

  • Animators: Walt Feimer (HTSI) (Lead); Scott Wiessinger (UMBC); Joseph Dwyer (FIT); Chris Meaney (HTSI)
  • Video Editor: Scott Wiessinger (UMBC)
  • Narrator: Karen Fox (ASI)
  • Producer: Scott Wiessinger (UMBC)
  • Writers: Francis Reddy (SPSYS); Scott Wiessinger (UMBC)



Swift and Hubble Probe an Asteroid Crash

  • Animators: Michael Lentz (UMBC) (Lead); Walt Feimer (HTSI); Scott Wiessinger (UMBC); Chris Smith (HTSI); Jake Dean (Aloe Design Studios); Chris Meaney (HTSI)
  • Video Editor: Scott Wiessinger (UMBC)
  • Narrator: Scott Wiessinger (UMBC)
  • Producer: Scott Wiessinger (UMBC)
  • Scientist: Dennis Bodewits (University of Maryland College Park)
  • Writers: Francis Reddy (SPSYS); Scott Wiessinger (UMBC)




DNA Building Blocks Can Be Made in Space

  • Animators: Chris Smith (HTSI) (Lead); Tyler Chase (UMBC)
  • Video Editor: Chris Smith (HTSI)
  • Interviewee: Michael P. Callahan (NASA/GSFC)
  • Producer: Chris Smith (HTSI)
  • Scientist: Michael P. Callahan (NASA/GSFC)
  • Videographer: Ryan Fitzgibbons (USRA)

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OH AND DID I MENTION? All opinions and opinionlike objects in this blog are mine alone and NOT those of NASA or Goddard Space Flight Center. And while we’re at it, links to websites posted on this blog do not imply endorsement of those websites by NASA.

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Earth Science Picture of the Day

December 12, 2011 Leave a comment
epod_12.12.11

Sarakiniko Beach on the island of Milos in the Aegean Sea


In July 2010, Geeked on Goddard marked the 10th anniversary of the Earth Science Picture of the Day (EPOD), a social media site founded at Goddard Space Flight Center.

EPOD is still going strong. Here is today’s Earth Science Picture of the Day,  Sarakiniko Beach on the island of Milos in the Aegean Sea.

Photographer: Attila Csernatoni
Summary Author: Attila Csernatoni

The photo above features Sarakiniko Beach on the island of Milos in the Aegean Sea. It’s one of the most bizarre beaches of the Cyclades island group. Milos is volcanic in origin. Volcanic activity in the southern Aegean area began some 2-3 million years ago — Milos was active until approximately 90,000 years ago. Two extinct volcanoes are found on the island, one near Firiplaka on the south coast, and one near Trachylas in the northwest. Obsidian that resulted from rhyolitic volcanism has been exploited here since Neolithic age (70,000 years ago). Sarakiniko Beach was partially formed from numerous episodes of fossil layering — of both sea and land organisms. The contrasting fossil layers, the wind and wave sculpted volcanic rock forms and the absence of vegetation gives the beach the look of a lunar landscape. Photo taken on June 18, 2011.



About EPOD
The Earth Science Picture of the Day (EPOD) was started at Goddard Space Flight Center in 2000 by scientist James Foster of Goddard’s Hydrological Sciences Laboratory and is a collaboration with Universities Space Research Association (USRA). USRA’s Stacy Bowles handles the technical aspects of the site with help from Erin Carver. Stu Witmer does the editing and runs the EPOD Facebook page.

Since its launch in September 2000, the Earth Science Picture of the Day (EPOD) website has provided a forum for professional photographers, educators, scientists, students and the general public to share images that highlight Earth Science processes and phenomena. To date, there are well over 3000 user-submitted images and educational summaries representing the full spectrum of Earth Science.

Each year EPOD receives more than twice as many submissions as can be published. Submissions are reviewed for scientific accuracy, topic relevance, and aesthetic appeal before publication. Further, EPOD receives more 2 million visits (worldwide) resulting in over 4 million page views each year. Web analytics also reveal that in addition to a loyal U.S. and Canadian audience, EPOD reaches viewers in 205 other countries and territories.

Visit the EPOD website if you would like to contribute your Earth photography to the project.

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OH AND DID I MENTION? All opinions and opinionlike objects in this blog are mine alone and NOT those of NASA or Goddard Space Flight Center. And while we’re at it, links to websites posted on this blog do not imply endorsement of those websites by NASA.


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Goddard astrophysicist Jane Rigby tells TEDx audience why space telescopes are so amazing

December 1, 2011 1 comment


Astrophysicist Jane Rigby joined Goddard about a year ago; she studies the evolution of galaxies. On Saturday, October 29, Rigby gave a talk about space telescopes to the TEDxMidAtlantic 2011 event in Washington, D.C.

You may have heard of the TED phenomenon. In the organization’s own words, “Speakers at TED events — some of the world’s most fascinating, innovative and influential individuals — are challenged to give “the talk of their life” in 18 minutes or less. TEDx is a sort of franchise of Big TED, known as “independently organized TED events.”

Big TED put out a call earlier this year for auditions for its annual conference in Long Beach. Rigby teamed up with fellow Goddard astrophysicist Amber Straughn to produce a 40-second narrated Keynote presentation as their audition entry.

It worked. Rigby was invited, along with 16 other finalists, to give a 5-minute live audition talk, in a bar in the Chelsea neighborhood of New York City on May 24. In the end, Big TED did not choose Rigby for this year’s conference.

But Rigby DID meet a person named Nate Mook, one of the organizers of the Mid-Atlantic TEDx conference. And Rigby gave her talk; here it is.

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Behind the scenes at the NPP press conference

October 27, 2011 Leave a comment
NPP missionj experts at the NASA press conference 10/26.

From left to right: George Diller, the voice of NASA TV; Tim Dunn NASA Launch Director from Kennedy Space Center; Vernon Thorpe, Program Manager for NASA missions from United Launch Alliance; Ken Schwer, NPP Project Manager, Goddard Space Flight Center; Lt. Lisa Cochran, Launch Weather Officer from the 30th Operations Support Squadron, Vandenberg.


Just before NPP’s prelaunch press conference, my fellow science writer Aries Keck handed me her tricked out camera and said: go wild. I grinned, tucked myself in the back corner, and took pictures of people taking pictures.

Best seats in the house. . .

Best seats in the house. . .

The camera operators had the best seats in the house. They were perched up on wooden blocks to get the head-on view of the panelists.

A couple of NASA photographers wandered around for the up close shots. And most of the rest pulled out their camera phones at one point or another.

The tech world of the modern media was everywhere: trip hazards in the aisles, working journalists with their laptops, and NASA Public Affairs lead Steve Cole on the Internet asking questions submitted by those watching the briefing live on NASA TV.

The briefing was a multimedia event with screens on the wall with video that some of us in the back had to crane to see. Also on display were models of the NPP and Delta II rocket that will take it into orbit. We even got to see a real sized satellite! Six CubeSats will be going up with NPP.

Goddard science writer Aries Keck held down the back corner live tweeting the press conference on her phone … and her computer on #NASANPP. — Ellen Gray, NPP media team

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Aries Keck tweets from the pre-launch.





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OH AND DID I MENTION? All opinions and opinionlike objects in this blog are mine alone and NOT those of NASA or Goddard Space Flight Center. And while we’re at it, links to websites posted on this blog do not imply endorsement of those websites by NASA.

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Model rocket attacks real (big) rocket!

July 27, 2011 2 comments
Looking up: Model rocket enthusiasts at the NASA Goddard visitor center

Looking up: Model rocket enthusiasts at the NASA Goddard visitor center


On Sunday, July 17, model rocket enthusiasts gathered at the Goddard Space Flight Center Visitor Center to commemorate the historic Apollo 11 launch and landing in 1969. Below is a clip of a puny model rocket “attacking” the magnificent, towering Thor Delta in back of the VC. Lucky strike! Watch it in HD/full screen for the full and dramatic effect of this modern-day reenactment of David vs. Goliath.

Regular public rocket launches began in 1976 as a program of the new Visitor Center and, of course, to mark the nation’s bicentennial. These days, it’s not uncommon for multiple generations to participate — even children of children of people who attended the early launches!

The special Apollo 11 launch event began in 1980. It’s always been on the third Sunday of July, which makes sure it coincides reasonably with the Apollo 11 anniversary.

“We have flown altitude, parachute duration, streamer duration and spot landing events over the years. I think we have kind of settled down for spot landing now,” explains Ed Pearson, a local model rocket enthusiast and longtime associate of the Visitor Center who helped start the public launches at Goddard.

More on that in a future post. Turns out the Visitor Center building has a more interesting history than imagined. More details to come…



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OH AND DID I MENTION? All opinions and opinionlike objects in this blog are mine alone and NOT those of NASA or Goddard Space Flight Center. And while we’re at it, links to websites posted on this blog do not imply endorsement of those websites by NASA.

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